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technology is automation. so the higher the government wants to make labor costs, the better for us." but some of the vendors who brought machines to keep it moving - no matter who's making it - say they are getting more inquiries but not full commitments yet. still, it's enough for nick kuecker's kansas city company that designs and builds these sorts of systems to look for more people to hire. "we're moving from hardware to software. so you're looking for i.t. people? yes, i.t. dot-net, c+ code writing and plc engineers for our company." the manufacturing outlook leads chris williamson, chief economist at financial information services firm markit, to believe the growth of gdp and non-farm payroll will accelerate in the first quarter. government cuts to defense are blamed for a huge loss at general dynamics. that tops our look at 4th quarter earnings this morning. general dynamics reported a $2-billion loss as its information tech business slows due to a decline in government contracts. xerox topped estimates, earning $335 million. it's shifting away from printing and offering mo
is into this belief that china is not slowing and that they actually come up with these numbers that the government cannot rig. none of the companies in china actually have real accounting companies auditing their numbers. including the government- > bonus round time. let's take a look at the top new year's resolutions. name the most popular resolution for the new year. is it: drink less alcohol lose weight or watch more traders unplugged on first business? > > use stop-losses. > > i think it is c, and i think alan is going to realize it turned into the biggest bear ever this year. i should have listened to andrew. the market is going to hell. > > you guys are great. thank you. prepare your taste buds. a look at what new trends the restaurant industry is cooking up for the new year. stay with with us. like fashion and hairstyles, food service in fact follows its own trends. so what's in store for the new year? david henkes is a vice president at technomic, the top food service research & consulting firm. i guess you would have liked to have gone out and done some of the field work yourself but you
rosenthal says government- directed taxpayer bailouts helped stabilize the economy. "instead of a big drop, we saw a softer landing but a longer recovery." under secretary geithner, the treasury department participated in bank bailouts despite risky gambles that led to the subprime mortgage collapse. critics say that under giethner, there was no assurance that banks would use their money to lend to business and homeowners. "there was no reportability, no accountability, it was just, 'give me the money and i'll save us.'" "the one part of the stimulus that worked was the money to state and local governments that went to teachers, firefighters, city workers. if that hadn't happened, unemployment would've been significantly worse." there were more bailouts. geithner oversaw $182 billion to insurance and financial services giant aig, which gave millions in bonuses to top executives responsible for aig's financial mess from credit default swaps. the auto bailout of gm and chrysler - the obama administration says it saved a million jobs. at his last speech as treasury secretary, geithner defende
by more than $1 million. additionally, it claims that employees used government-issued travel cards for personal travel. the postal service has agreed to the watchdog's recommendations. feeling pressure after the newtown shootings, groupon is halting all gun-related deals. the daily deals company says it is responding to customer pressure and has canceled all planned any existing discounts for shooting range and clay shooting outings. the curtain is closing on 300 blockbuster stores across the country. according to a report, dish network is shutting down stores that are underperforming or near the end of a lease. dish bought the video rental chain in 2011, when it was bankrupt. the move is costing 3,000 employees their jobs. last year, the colorado economic development commission granted dish $2.5 million in job growth tax credits. famous for not charging fees, southwest airlines introduces a new one. passengers who can't stand the cattle call boarding process can now opt out by paying $40 to board early. southwest does not have assigned seating, and already offers passengers early
them---but never say i hit a wall. that's what companies and people and even governments do to succeed. you also have to have a team. you have to be flexible. you have to take risks. and when you fail you have to learn from your failure, pick yourself up, get up and do it better next time. gary, those don't sound like radical ideas. it seems like almost common business sense. well some of it is common business sense of course. there's a lack of common business sense with some companies. you also have to figure out what you're good at. one of the things that is uncommon, people say they have weaknesses so therefore they should correct them. no, for people and even for businesses you're not going to correct your weaknesses but you hire people that will correct the weaknesses. you don't try to change people. how do you motivate people? not just by money. you have to get to know them as people and understand their needs and wants and desires and they go through lifecycles. you have to do things differently and think outside the box. provide something that people want to buy and listen to y
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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